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China vs. the United States

A Popularity Contest in the Global Court of Public Opinion

Economic Power

The two superpowers went head-to-head in a worldwide survey, recently published by the Pew Research Center. Comparisons in the survey included perceptions of global image, world power, ways of doing business, popular culture, political views, individual rights, science and military threat, among others.

Based on the survey, the Pew Report identified the following general global opinions:*

Strong Ties with US or China

China’s economic power is on the rise, and many think it will eventually supplant the United States as the world’s dominant superpower.

  • Overall, the U.S. enjoys a stronger global image than China.
  • Globally, people are more likely to consider the U.S. a partner to their country than to see China in this way, although relatively few think of either nation as an enemy.
  • The military power of both nations worries many.
  • China’s growing military strength is viewed with trepidation in neighboring Japan, South Korea, Australia and the Philippines.
  • Meanwhile, the Obama administration’s use of drone strikes faces broad opposition – half or more in 31 of 39 countries disapprove of U.S. drone attacks against extremist groups.
  • Across the nations surveyed, a median of 70% say the American government respects the personal freedoms of its people. In contrast, a median of only 36% say this about China.

US consider your interestsChina consider your interests

Not surprisingly, attitudes towards the U.S. and China varied significantly by region:

  • In Europe, the U.S. gets mostly positive ratings. President Barack Obama has been consistently popular among Europeans, and since he took office in 2009, Obama’s popularity has given America’s image a significant boost in the region.
  • European perceptions of China are much less positive – among the eight European Union nations polled, Greece is the only one in which a majority expresses a favorable view of China.
  • Moreover, ratings for China have declined significantly over the last two years in a number of EU countries, including Britain, France, Poland and Spain.
  • America’s image is the most negative in parts of the Muslim world, especially Pakistan (11% favorable), Jordan (14%), Egypt (16%), and the Palestinian territories (16%). Only 21% of Turks see the U.S. positively, although this is actually a slight improvement from last year’s 15%.
  • But the Muslim world is hardly monolithic, and America receives largely positive ratings in predominantly Muslim nations such as Senegal in West Africa and Indonesia and Malaysia in Southeast Asia.
  • Elsewhere in the Asia/Pacific region, the U.S. receives particularly favorable reviews in the Philippines, South Korea and Japan.
  • Chinese investment in Latin America and sub-Saharan Africa has increased significantly over the past decade, and views toward China are largely positive in both regions.
  • Attitudes toward the U.S. also tend to be favorable, and overall the U.S. receives slightly higher ratings than China in in Latin America and sub-Saharan Africa.

The survey also finds rising tensions between the American and Chinese publics:

  • Just 37% of Americans express a positive view of China, down from 51% two years ago.
  • Similarly, ratings for the U.S. have plummeted in China – in a 2010 poll conducted a few months after a visit to China by President Obama, 58% had a favorable impression of the U.S., compared with 40% today.
  • Young people in both countries express more positive attitudes about the other, a finding that is part of a broader pattern – in many countries, both the U.S. and China receive more favorable marks from people under age 30.
*Note: Survey conclusions above are quoted verbatim to avoid external  interpretation of the results.

For more details, the full 132-page report may be downloaded from the Pew Research Center at the following link:

http://www.pewglobal.org/files/2013/07/Pew-Research-Global-Attitudes-Project-Balance-of-Power-Report-FINAL-July-18-2013.pdf

The report above is shared courtesy of Ray Hays, Member of Arizona District Export Council.

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Enter new markets: four smart moves

How can you hit the ground running in a brand-new market?

HSBC Global Connections, 17 July 2013
Re-blogged Courtesy of Ray Hays, Member of Arizona District Export Council

Entering a new market

How can you hit the ground running in a brand-new market? From moving up the supply chain to targeting a trophy customer, we look at four ways to give your sales volumes a boost from day one.

A kick-start can get you moving in a new market – and it needn’t be a short-term gimmick. Two food retailers reveal the levers they’ve used.

Go direct to the vendors

Marmalade maker Paul Grant, who owns Scotland-based Mackays, plans to target US grocery chains directly, rather than selling through a wholesaling distributor. The savings will allow him to knock a third off the shelf price.

“You do need to find partners who are prepared to go direct,” he warns. “Some of the traditional importing companies are sometimes reluctant to change the supply chain route, but our importer has been very flexible.”

Make a smart move

Grant is also experimenting with a technique called ‘smart value positioning’, which has been used by fashion brands in the US.

There, high-end products which are sold for a premium price in department stores are stocked in mid-market stores at a better value price.

Capture a trophy

Upmarket chocolatier Richard O’Connor targets a trophy customer in each new market to give his firm, Chocolate & Love, a seal of approval he can use for leverage with smaller outlets.

In the UK, a deal with Harvey Nichols led to subsequent deals with 90 independent fine food shops. An approach to Copenhagen shopping centre Magasin Du Nord likewise put the company on the ‘pre-approved’ list for Denmark’s smaller specialist outlets.

Ask the experts

The two-year-old company exports to Nordic markets as well as France, Belgium and the US, but the overseas orientation by definition exposes O’Connor to markets in which he has few or no contacts. The key is finding the right partner in each market.

O’Connor’s advice is not to be afraid of asking trusted companies in the same industry for help. “In the tight-knit fine food business, trust counts for a lot. I was lucky enough to meet an entrepreneur with more experience who was willing to share her contacts.”

Source: HSBC

Re-blogged Courtesy of Ray Hays, Member of Arizona District Export Council

Guest blog post: Developing Foreign Business is Easier than You Think | Department of Commerce

Guest blog post: Developing Foreign Business is Easier than You Think

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Portrait of Friesen

Guest blog post by Dr. Cody Friesen, founder and president of Fluidic Energy, an associate professor at Arizona State University and a member of the U.S.Manufacturing Council.

As the founder of Fluidic Energy and a member of the Department of Commerce’sManufacturing Council, I’m always mindful of the state of the economy. It’s impossible not to notice the beneficial impact of trade, and the importance of manufacturing, to the continued growth of U.S. exports.

The Manufacturing Council exists to advise Commerce leadership on the best policies to support manufacturing and U.S. exports.As great as exporting sounds in theory, the barriers to exporting can seem high to many small or medium-sized companies, but that’s really not the case.

I had the privilege of joining Acting Secretary of Commerce Rebecca Blank and 19 other American companies on a trade mission to Latin America, discussing infrastructure development in the region.

We were able to meet one-on-one with government officials and foreign company executives who will be shaping the growing infrastructure of these growing economies. We made crucial contacts and learned the critical facts in each country that will help us to maximize the opportunities for our company in the region.

The Department of Commerce was instrumental in pulling together the meetings most meaningful to Fluidic. TheGold Key Matching Service and the local International Trade Administration staff, especially the U.S. Commercial Service personnel, in each country made it possible to rapidly assess potential business opportunities.

Gold Key is a truly remarkable, and perhaps underutilized, service available to any company looking to potentially enter any of the 72 countries in which ITA has a presence. I can’t speak highly enough of the committed staff with whom we worked in the run up to the mission, and their attentiveness to our business needs once in country.

Fluidic Energy now has the facts, the contacts, and the industry awareness to make sure we can compete as these regions develop the next generation of their energy infrastructure.

So how’d we do it? Simple: we applied.

The Department of Commerce’s International Trade Administration leads missions like this regularly. You just find the industry and the region most suited for your business. Then you apply. Then you export.

As we export, we support the economic recovery. We prove that in the face of a global supply chain and a global customer base that U.S. manufacturing is far from dead. We also advance the U.S. knowledge economy, provide protection for our businesses against economic downturns, and we help foreign companies and consumers around the world understand that nothing beats the products made by American companies.

I’d like to thank the Acting Secretary, who is just about to return to academia (yeah!), for leading this mission. She is one of those rare people who find themselves in important roles yet remain remarkably gracious while navigating what most certainly is a highly demanding role. I wish her all the best in her new role.

If you aren’t exporting because you think the barrier to entry is too high, you’re missing out. I hope more of my advanced technology and manufacturing colleagues in the U.S. get on board. The world wants what we have to offer.

Remember, “Sine labore nihil”–without labor nothing.

Guest blog post: Developing Foreign Business is Easier than You Think | Department of Commerce.

Is America really terrible at globalization?

I disagree with this post, but I feel that it merits discussion. What are your opinions?

Re-blogged from qz.com courtesy of Ray Hays, Member of Arizona District Export Council.

“The Big Mac Mirage”: America is actually terrible at globalization

By Tim Fernholz — March 5, 2013

Shockingly, this is about as good as American globalization gets. AP Photo/Ng Han Guan

Coke is so prevalent around the world that non-profits look to its supply chain for help on distributing aid. McDonalds, in 122 different countries, is so widespread that there’s a foreign relations theory that no two countries hosting the burger franchise will go to war, although the strong version of that theory is well dead. And Wal-Mart is the world’s third largest global employer, after the American and Chinese militaries, respectively.

The US must be great at globalization, right?

Unfortunately, no, according to Bhaskar Chakravorti, the director of Tufts’ University’s Institute for Business in the Global Context. He says all these examples represent “the myth of American global market power”—they are outliers that disguise the real failing of American multinationals to succeed around the world, and especially in fast-growing emerging markets. Despite what you might hear, he says “we are extremely under globalized.” Here’s an excerpt from a forthcoming paper he’s written with fellow economist Gita Rao (emphasis mine):

In 2010, emerging markets represented 36% of global GDP; these markets already account for the majority of the world’s oil and steel consumption, 46% of world retail sales, 52% of all purchases of motor vehicles and 82% of mobile phone subscriptions. With two-thirds of global growth coming from these markets, in a decade they will account for the majority of the world’s economic value. Yet U.S. companies derived less than 10% of their overall revenues from emerging markets: about as little as 7%, according to HSBC estimates for 2010. The 100 largest companies from the developed world overall made 17% of their revenues from emerging markets, according to a McKinsey report; in other words, the U.S. lags not only emerging market firms in capturing share in emerging markets, but it lags the developed world overall. By considering the difference between the “absolute potential” represented by the 36% number or, to take a much more conservative benchmark, the global peer average of 17% and the U.S. share of 7%, we derive two measures of the gap – and the degree to which U.S. industry has not participated in global growth.

There are several reasons the US is being held back. Some are the intrinsic challenges of doing business abroad: Besides language and cultural barriers, there are underdeveloped supply chains, incomplete capital markets, corruption, etc. But European companies earn 25% of their revenues from emerging markets, so these must be surmountable. What’s America’s problem?

America doesn’t have a legacy of colonization. Despite a hefty history of foreign interference, the US didn’t set up the same deep linkages that Spanish and Portuguese companies did in South America or European countries have in Africa or South Asia. Chakravorti, who was a McKinsey executive for many years, recalls European competitors in Africa asking, ”What are you doing in Africa? Africa belongs to us.” Meanwhile, he says, ”the executives I was working with had no understanding of the socio-cultural context of the continent.”

America is actually pretty insular. Because it’s a big country, and has had many decades of consumer-driven growth, US businesses haven’t necessarily had to look over the horizon for new opportunities. After the 9/11 attacks, Chakravorti says, things got even worse, and most businesses stayed home. It doesn’t help that less than 20% of Americans speak a language other than English, while 56% of Europeans speak a second language.

American business is all about standardization. Companies get economies of scale from selling the same product, but many emerging markets are stratified and require different products and price-points in the same country; while American executives want a  ”Brazil strategy,” what they really need is a strategy for Sao Paulo state and another for more rural areas.

Chakravorti argues that American companies do have what it takes to surmount these challenges, and they’ll need to if they want to bring more growth back to the US.

His strategy starts with a focus on sectors where America can compete abroad but isn’t taking full advantage of the opportunities, particularly in consumer products and large-scale services such as education, elder- and child-care. American companies need to start thinking about tailoring their strategies to demand abroad—particularly at the bottom of the pyramid— but the market can’t do it alone: The government needs to work more closely to tailor its foreign policy to America’s commercial needs while opening education to a more international view.

“That gap has been closed completely in China, because the most powerful companies are state-owned,” Chakravorti says. “We are still talking about the Asia pivot as though it is something dramatic and new, while China has been pivoting for a while.”

Original article link: http://qz.com/59506

How does the U.S. Federal Export Promotion Stack Up to Other Exporting Countries?

Re-blogged from the National District Export Council website www.districtexportcouncil.com.

Export Expenditures

On February 28, 2013, Daniel Ogden, Chairman of the National District Export Council,  testified before Congress during a hearing of the House Small Business Trade Subcommittee on the development by the 113th Congress of a small business trade agenda.

In the Testimony, Daniel Ogden provides a comparison of U.S. federal export assistance programs with government-funded export assistance in other large exporting countries. Highlights include:

  1. The UK’s Passport to Export program for SMEs provides free one-on-one mentoring, subsidized training, and a subsidized visit to an overseas market.
  2. Germany provides support to firms exhibiting in trade fairs abroad.  60 percent of all German firms participate in trade fairs; two thirds of which exhibit abroad.
  3. France’s Trade Missions Overseas program provides up to $3,750 to SMEs and includes French pavilions at trade fairs, products and displays, and other t trade promotions.
  4. The Netherlands and Australia have grant programs that pay (up to $110,000 in the Netherlands) for new exporters’ market development costs.

Ogden’s testimony also includes several useful facts on US export assistance including:

  • An overview of the District Export Councils and their purpose
  • Opportunities and challenges for U.S. small business exporters
  • Current organization and proposed reorganizations in federal trade promotions
  • National District Export Council’s position and recommendations to Congress on federal trade promotion

Click here for a PDF copy of the Testimony Transcript, or see the Testimony video below. (Testimony starts at time marker 8:55.)

For more information on the National District Export Council, please refer to their website at http://www.districtexportcouncil.com.

Re-blogged courtesy of Ray Hays, Member of the Arizona District Export Council

38% Growth in Exports over 3 Years Supports 10 million U.S. Jobs

Reblogged courtesy of Ray Hays, Member of Arizona District Export Council

Recognizing Three Years of Export Growth

An article from the ITA Blog, by Under Secretary of Commerce Francisco Sánchez 

March 12, 2013

Francisco Sánchez serves as the Under Secretary of Commerce for International Trade. 

During the last several weeks, we’ve highlighted a lot of great news in the business of U.S. exports.

From record exports in travel and tourism tosuccesses in gaining access for American companies to foreign markets, 2012 gave us a lot to be proud of in the field of exports. More important than just the dollar amounts is the fact that almost 10 million jobs were supported by these exports in 2012.

This success is the direct result of a concentrated initiative introduced by President Obama in 2010, one that has coordinated the efforts of several U.S. government agencies to increase American exports and create American jobs. Under the National Export Initiative (NEI), we’ve seen U.S. exports increase from $1.58 trillion in 2009, to a record $2.2 trillion in 2012.

We recognize the third anniversary of the NEI this week, so we’ll be sharing some of the successes we’ve seen under this initiative over the next several days.

I hope you will get in on the conversation. How have exports helped your business? How can the International Trade Administration and other government agencies help you increase exports? Follow some of America’s core export-promotion agencies on this Twitter list to learn about the government’s efforts to help U.S. business.

As always, ITA is here to help any U.S. company looking to create or increase exports. It all starts with a visit to one of our Export Assistance Centers or to export.gov.

Source: Tradeology, the ITA Blog

Re-blogged courtesy of Ray Hays, Member of Arizona District Export Council

$30 Million in Grants for SME Exporters of U.S. Products and Services

In fiscal year 2011, SBA awarded 52 grants totaling $30 million

money globe

By Ray Hays, International Consultant and Member of the Arizona District Export Council. 

Re-blogging of this post is permitted and encouraged.

As many U.S. small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) compete for revenue from new markets, they often overlook the global picture: Promote your products and services internationally. While it sounds daunting, it’s often a simple matter of funding and international expertise to sell your products and services into global markets.

What if your company had the opportunity to leverage international business experts from the public and private sector to market your product internationally? At no cost?

Welcome to the best kept public secret in international business.

The Small Business Administration (SBA) offers grants through the State Trade and Export Promotion Grant (STEP) program. Over the last year, $30 million in export promotion grants were awarded through the SBA, and the same amounts are expected for 2013 and 2014

The rules and amounts of the grants will vary by state, but in many cases, U.S. exporters of products and services are eligible for thousands of dollars in export promotion grants.

Depending on the state, these grants may be applied toward the travel and fees of several export promotion opportunities:

  • Trade Missions – These are usually managed through the individual state trade agencies or through federal agencies, such as the U.S. Commercial Service. These trade missions typically gather attendees from a sector to participate in a multi-country promotional visit, supported by the the Trade Representatives at U.S. Embassies in those countries.
  • Trade Shows and Fairs – Similar to the trade missions, your state and federal agencies may attend a industry-specific Trade Show, with U.S. small businesses representatives.
  • Individual Company Promotion Events – Through the U.S. Commercial Service and other organizations, U.S. businesses have the opportunity to have a custom program that helps the American company to identify buyers, distributors, licensees or other partners in key international markets. These programs (such as the USCS Gold Key Program) typically leverage the resources of the U.S. embassies and consulates in the international markets.
  • Privately Contracted Export Marketing and Promotion — A range of U.S. companies work closely with the USCS and other agencies to provide contracted export assistance to SMEs. Often these private contractors supplement existing U.S. government programs, providing small businesses with the management guidance and experience to maximize their success in their export marketing efforts.

As a (very rough) example, a Trade Show may require a travel budget of $5,000 and exhibition costs of $5,000. Some U.S. companies can qualify for reimbursement of 75% or more of the travel cost and 100% of the exhibition costs through the STEP Grant program. This would bring the cost of a $10K trade show into the range of $1,250… Other export promotion activities may be covered in-full.

Of course, a U.S. company should not strike out blindly into the international marketplace. Your company will need to identify target markets, evaluate risk/returns based on the country regulations and demographics, build a model for international expansion and finally, execute on this plan.

If you do not have the international expertise in-house, you can work with a U.S. contractor — a consultant or management firm — to plan and deploy the export promotion strategy.

Whether your company builds an international team in-house or contracts international management specialists, this would be a good time to take action. The second year of SBA STEP Grants are already awarded, and the third (and final) year of STEP Grants are awaiting proposals. Go get your piece of the international pie.

In addition to these grants, export financing programs for SMEs are available through SBA and Overseas Private Investment Corporation (OPIC).

For resources, please contact your regional District Export Council (Google it for your state), or the nearest U.S. Commercial Service Export Assistance Center.

Having personally participated in over 40 international events and trade missions through the USCS, I highly recommend using their services. I am currently a Member of the District Export Council in my home state of Arizona, which works closely with the USCS on export promotion efforts.

Regardless of your location, please feel free to contact me if you would like more information on these programs, and I would be happy to point you to the appropriate export assistance resource in your local market.

This article is based on current knowledge to-date of STEP Grants based on various government websites. The program details may vary by state and rules are often updated. For the latest information please click on this link for the SBA website page on the STEP Grants.

Please re-blog or re-post this article to your social media groups and professional contacts interested in international business.

Copyright Ray Hays, Envoy Investments LLC. All rights reserved. Re-blogging of this post is permitted. Referrals to http://www.rayhays.com are appreciated.

Ray Hays owns Envoy Consulting, which provides international business development guidance for U.S. product and service exporters. Ray is a Member of the Arizona District Export Council.  Email: ray@rayhays.com, cell: 714-797-3386, Skype: Ray_Hays.

American SME Merchandise Exports Grow 24% in 2010

Article from ITA Blog, re-blogged courtesy of Ray Hays – Member Arizona District Export Council

Brief Review of U.S. SME Trading Companies in 2010

December 6, 2012

David Moore is an economist in the Office of Trade and Industry Information within the International Trade Administration.

This week the International Trade Administration’s Office of Trade and Industry Information released an annual update to its website for the U.S. Commerce Department’s Exporter Database (EDB) for 2010. This joint project with the U.S. Census Bureau’s Foreign Trade Division is the cornerstone of ITA’s Trade Data Enhancement Initiative, the goal of which is to develop and disseminate improved statistical information on U.S. international trade and its role in the U.S. economy. Additional information on the EDB can be obtained by viewing the U.S. Census Bureau’s Profile of U.S. Exporting Companies, 2009-2010.

In 2010, more than 293,000 U.S. companies exported goods, up 6.0 percent from the revised 2009 estimate of 276,600. In 2010, nearly 98 percent of U.S. exporters (286,661) were small or medium-sized companies (SMEs*) with fewer than 500 employees, a 6.1 percent increase over 2009. Further, the known merchandise export value of SMEs rose to $383.4 billion in 2010, up 24.1 percent from 2009 and this accounted for 33.7 percent of the $1,138 billion total known merchandise export value of all companies.

Known Merchandise Export Value of Trading Companies, 2009 and 2010 in U.S. dollars. All identified companies $940,400,000 in 2009 and $1,137,600,000. SME's $308,900,000 in 2009 and $383,400,000 in 2010. Companies with 500 or more employees $631,500,000 in 2009 and $754,200,000 in 2010.

SME Exports at the State Level

SME exports are concentrated in the largest exporting states, with the top four exporting more than $30 billion from SMEs.  California had the largest value of SME exports ($68.1 billion) in 2010, followed by Texas ($51.2 billion), New York ($34.4 billion), and Florida ($33.6 billion).

SME export value at the state level in U.S. dollars. California: $68,087,967,616, Texas: $51,200,446,724, New York: $34,394,384,363, Florida: $33,557,306,907, New Jersey: $15,122,026,840, Illinois: $14,445,622,703, Pennsylvania: $12,519,691,700, Washington: $11,017,998,632, Michigan: $10,506,510,110, Massachusetts: $10,051,122,079, Ohio: $9,321,029,844, Louisiana: $8,806,538,601, Georgia: $8,448,288,399, Puerto Rico: $7,051,941,052, Minnesota: $5,740,296,134, Oregon: $5,649,311,876, North Carolina: $5,599,660,584, Wisconsin: $5,531,778,198, Connecticut: $5,372,732,418, Indiana: $4,974,567,439, Virginia: $4,139,241,848, Tennessee: $4,023,677,667, Missouri: $3,775,289,203, Arizona: $3,578,474,711, Kentucky: $3,484,101,860, Kansas: $3,258,410,258, Maryland: $2,819,330,154, Colorado: $2,671,823,591, South Carolina: $2,632,285,300, Utah: $2,584,426,888, Alabama: $2,561,215,935, New Hampshire: $1,776,065,210, Iowa: $1,745,671,009, Oklahoma: $1,622,778,640, Nebraska: $1,409,866,973, Mississippi: $1,407,996,974, Nevada: $1,210,149,129, West Virginia: $1,144,895,941, Montana: $1,059,154,716, Rhode Island: $1,054,668,411, Idaho: $1,031,234,308, Maine: $992,455,877, Arkansas: $898,080,029, Delaware: $775,404,661, District Of Columbia: $688,447,135, New Mexico: $680,508,632, North Dakota: $562,363,709, South Dakota: $443,896,862, Alaska: $394,898,004, Hawaii: $161,527,055, Wyoming: $141,245,194, Vermont: No data available for Vermont in 2010.

Note: SME values for Vermont are unavailable for 2010.

However, SME exporters represent a large share of the value of U.S. exports in both small and large states.  79 percent of Montana’s exports in 2010 were from SMEs, the highest share in the nation.  Florida, Rhode Island, Wyoming, and New York all had an SME share of exports over 50% as well.

Selected state SME share of exports: Montana: 79%, Florida: 68%, Rhode Island: 63%,   Wyoming: 56%, New York: 55%.

SME Exporters at the Metropolitan Level

The New York metro area had the largest number of known SME exporters at 32,300, followed closely by Los Angles (32,100), Miami (26,300), Chicago (13,300), and Houston (10,500).  Further world destination break-outs by the European Union-27, NAFTA, ASEAN, and DR-CAFTA are shown below. Other country groupings such as APEC and OPEC can also be accessed using the EDB website.

Number of Known SME Exporting Companies to Select World Regions by Metro. New York Metro: 11,645 to the EU, 10,540 to NAFTA, 2,370 to DR-CAFTA, and 3,436 to ASEAN; Los Angeles Metro: 8,938 to the EU, 12,242 to NAFTA, 1,947 to DR-CAFTA, and 4,548 to ASEAN; Miami Metro: 4,194 to the EU, 3,985 to NAFTA, 5,730 to DR-CAFTA, and 1,234 to ASEAN; Chicago Metro: 4,184 to the EU, 6,639 to NAFTA, 910 to DR-CAFTA, and 1,614 to ASEAN; Houston Metro: 2,640 to the EU, 3,653 to NAFTA, 649 to DR-CAFTA, and 1,740 to ASEAN.

SME Exporters at the Five-Digit Zip Code Level

Of the 25,754 zip-codes in the U.S. reporting at least one SME exporter, nine of these zip-codes reported one thousand or more SME exporters. Miami had the largest concentration in five zip codes (33166, 33172, 33178, 33122, 33126), followed by New York in three zip codes (10036, 10018 and 10001) and Los Angeles in one (90021).  Further, 673 zip-codes reported between 100 – 923 known SME exporters, while the remaining balance of zip codes reported between 1 and 99.

SME Exporters by zip code. In Miami, zip code 33166 has 4,023 SME exporters, zip code   33172 has 2,317 SME exporters, zip code 33178 has 2,033 SME exporters, zip code 33122   has 1,573 SME exporters and zip code 33126 has 1,203 SME exporters. In New York, zip   code 10036 has 1,625 SME exporters, zip code 10036 has 1,354 SME exporters, and zip code   10001 has 1,273 SME exporters. In Los Angeles, zip code 90021 has 1,109 SME exporters.

In closing, the EDB offers a whole host of information on U.S. exporters, not only by company size and type (manufacturers, wholesalers and other non-manufacturing firms) but also by 3 and 4 digit NAICS product codes, and export country destination, etc. This is just a small slice of EDB data available on our website, but we encourage U.S. companies and professionals working in global trade, policy, cooperation and promotion to utilize this snap-shot of 2010 as they continue to map out their strategies for export success in the future.

*SMEs are defined as firms that have fewer than 500 employees. All figures in this overview include only identifiable or “known” exports, i.e., exports that can be linked to individual companies using information on U.S. export declarations.

U.S. Exports to Taiwan Growing at 40%

In the rush to the growing mainland Chinese market, some companies overlook the opportunity in Taiwan…

 

Perhaps international companies could learn from former Chinese leader Deng Xiaoping, who said, “cross the river by feeling out the stepping stones.” With a GDP growth rate of 10.5%, the Taiwanese market can serve as an excellent stepping stone into the mainland Chinese market.

Taiwan is identified as a priority market by the U.S. National Export Initiative (NEI). Part of the reason is that U.S. companies have a longer history and fewer complications doing business in Taiwan. This is especially important for U.S. small business exporters, who may find the mainland China market daunting. Taiwan is an easier first step.

In this brief video, the U.S. Senior Commercial Officer in Taipei explains which U.S. export sectors have the best opportunity:

From the U.S. National Export Initiative (NEI)

With a population of only 23 million, Taiwan is our ninth-largest trading partner, ahead of much larger economies. Taiwan’s GDP grew by almost 10.5 percent in 2010, while U.S. exports increased by 40 percent. Taiwan has considerably lowered its tariffs since its accession to the WTO in 2002. The island has benefited economically from expanding business activities into the Chinese Mainland. Taiwan imports a wide variety of electronic, optical and precision instruments, information and communications products, transportation equipment, machinery, and electrical products. Its high-tech sector relies heavily on technology licenses and imports of specialty components from the United States.

For more information about Taiwan:

 

Brought to you by Ray Hays, Member Arizona District Export Council.

Ray Hays serves as an international consultant for businesses that wish to enter new global markets or expand current operations abroad.

Click here for more information on consulting services of Ray Hays.


Exporting to Vietnam – Quick Tips for Smooth Sailing…

Seeking untapped export opportunities? Then take a look at Vietnam.

From the U.S. National Export Initiative (NEI)

Vietnam is a true emerging market, offering ground floor and growing opportunities for U.S. exporters and investors. Vietnam’s economic growth rate has been among the highest in the world, expanding at an average of 7.2 percent per year from 2001 to 2010.  Since the 2001 Bilateral Trade Agreement, trade between the U.S. and Vietnam has increased over six-fold, from $2.9 billion in 2002 to $18.6 billion in 2010.  In 2010, U.S. exports to Vietnam grew by 19.8 percent to $3.7 billion.

For more information about Vietnam:

Brought to you by Ray Hays, Member Arizona District Export Council.

Ray Hays serves as an international consultant for businesses that wish to enter new global markets or expand current operations abroad.

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