//
archives

U.S. Department of Commerce

This tag is associated with 17 posts

What are the Hot U.S. Export Metro Markets? A Report by the International Trade Administration

Metro Exports Continue to Rise in 2012

July 11, 2013 – ITA Blog

Reblogged courtesy of Ray Hays, Member of Arizona District Export Council
 
Five metro areas achieved more than $50 billion in 2012 exports.

Natalie Soroka is an economist in the Office of Trade and Industry Information within the International Trade Administration where she focuses on international trade statistics and trends.

Five metro areas achieved more than $50 billion in 2012 exports and ten surpassed $25 billion.

After hitting new highs in 2011, exports from U.S. metropolitan areas continued to increase in 2012, with 170 of the 370 metro areas with available data reporting record-high merchandise exports.

Houston-Sugar Land-Baytown, TX topped the list as the largest metro exporter in 2012, shipping $110.3 billion of goods abroad.

Overall, many areas saw continued growth in 2012, with exports increasing in 220 metro areas from the previous year.

The Seattle, WA area saw the highest dollar growth in 2012, up $9.2 billion from 2011. Other areas showing high dollar growth included:

  • Detroit-Warren-Livonia, MI (up $6.0 billion),
  • Houston-Sugar Land-Baytown, TX (up $5.8 billion),
  • Miami-Fort Lauderdale-Pompano Beach, FL (up $4.7 billion),
  • and Washington-Arlington-Alexandria, DC-VA-MD-WV (up $4.4 billion).

While large areas like Houston, New York and Los Angeles contribute greatly to the value of exports from metropolitan areas sent around the world, exports are an important economic driver in smaller markets, too. In 2012, 153 small metro areas exported more than $1 billion of goods. Of these metros, exports from Bloomington, IN exceeded $1 billion for the first time in 2012.

Viewing exports from the metropolitan perspective is important, as these are concentrated areas for industries and economic activity. In 2011, 22 metropolitan areas represented more than 40 percent of their state’s total merchandise export activity.

One such area in 2012 was Miami-Fort Lauderdale-Pompano Beach, FL, whose $47.9 billion in exports accounted for 69 percent of Florida’s total goods exports that year. Aerospace products and parts accounted for the largest share of Miami’s exports, amounting to $4.8 billion in 2012. Other top export categories from Miami that year were computer and peripheral equipment ($4.1 billion) and communications equipment ($3.5 billion).

Of the metro areas in Florida where data is available, 11 MSAs reported increased exports in 2012, led by increases in Miami, Lakeland, and Orlando. On the local level, areas often benefit from geographic proximity and economic or cultural ties to a particular country or region. In fact, Latin American partners dominate Miami’s exports.  Miami exported $18.3 billion of goods to South American markets in 2012, led by Miami’s top market: Venezuela ($5.6 billion). Other top Miami markets in 2012 were Colombia ($2.8 billion), Brazil ($2.6 billion), Mexico ($2.1 billion), and Chile ($2.0 billion).

Miami was also the top exporter to the Dominican Republic-Central America Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA-DR) region in 2012, exporting nearly $5.0 billion to this market in 2012, more than a quarter of which (27 percent) went to the Dominican Republic. Miami actually exported more to the six CAFTA members than it did to either the EU or our NAFTA partners.

While it’s too early to determine any effect from the new free trade agreements with Colombia and Panama, in 2012 Miami was the second largest metro exporter to both of these regions, indicating that it stands to benefit from increased trade with these markets in the future.

This data displays the importance exports are to not only our national economy, but to local economies throughout the country. Exports strengthen local economies and create millions of jobs.

In 2012, exporters reached an all-time record of $2.2 trillion in U.S. exports, supporting 9.8 million jobs. The Department of Commerce has collaborated with the Brookings Institution Metropolitan Policy Program in order to create the Metropolitan Export Initiative. This initiative’s goal is to promote exports and investments in metropolitan regions through localized export plans.

Beginning with the release of 2012 data, information on exports by county and 4-digit NAICS industry codeare available for the top 50 U.S. metro areas.

Visit ITA’s Metropolitan Export Series homepage for more information on metropolitan area exports, including datafact sheets for the top 50 exporting MSAs in 2012, an overview of U.S. Metropolitan Area Exports, and the U.S. Trade Overview with new regional spotlights.

Reblogged courtesy of Ray Hays, Member of Arizona District Export Council.

Does you company need to improve your numbers selling to senior executives?  VASS® Training Group retrains companies to sell at the executive level and increase sales revenues 25% to 100%. VASS® has been doing so for 38 years. We exist only to create a profit for our clients. Click here for more details.

VASS logo

Advertisements

Guest blog post: Developing Foreign Business is Easier than You Think | Department of Commerce

Guest blog post: Developing Foreign Business is Easier than You Think

Printer-friendly version

Portrait of Friesen

Guest blog post by Dr. Cody Friesen, founder and president of Fluidic Energy, an associate professor at Arizona State University and a member of the U.S.Manufacturing Council.

As the founder of Fluidic Energy and a member of the Department of Commerce’sManufacturing Council, I’m always mindful of the state of the economy. It’s impossible not to notice the beneficial impact of trade, and the importance of manufacturing, to the continued growth of U.S. exports.

The Manufacturing Council exists to advise Commerce leadership on the best policies to support manufacturing and U.S. exports.As great as exporting sounds in theory, the barriers to exporting can seem high to many small or medium-sized companies, but that’s really not the case.

I had the privilege of joining Acting Secretary of Commerce Rebecca Blank and 19 other American companies on a trade mission to Latin America, discussing infrastructure development in the region.

We were able to meet one-on-one with government officials and foreign company executives who will be shaping the growing infrastructure of these growing economies. We made crucial contacts and learned the critical facts in each country that will help us to maximize the opportunities for our company in the region.

The Department of Commerce was instrumental in pulling together the meetings most meaningful to Fluidic. TheGold Key Matching Service and the local International Trade Administration staff, especially the U.S. Commercial Service personnel, in each country made it possible to rapidly assess potential business opportunities.

Gold Key is a truly remarkable, and perhaps underutilized, service available to any company looking to potentially enter any of the 72 countries in which ITA has a presence. I can’t speak highly enough of the committed staff with whom we worked in the run up to the mission, and their attentiveness to our business needs once in country.

Fluidic Energy now has the facts, the contacts, and the industry awareness to make sure we can compete as these regions develop the next generation of their energy infrastructure.

So how’d we do it? Simple: we applied.

The Department of Commerce’s International Trade Administration leads missions like this regularly. You just find the industry and the region most suited for your business. Then you apply. Then you export.

As we export, we support the economic recovery. We prove that in the face of a global supply chain and a global customer base that U.S. manufacturing is far from dead. We also advance the U.S. knowledge economy, provide protection for our businesses against economic downturns, and we help foreign companies and consumers around the world understand that nothing beats the products made by American companies.

I’d like to thank the Acting Secretary, who is just about to return to academia (yeah!), for leading this mission. She is one of those rare people who find themselves in important roles yet remain remarkably gracious while navigating what most certainly is a highly demanding role. I wish her all the best in her new role.

If you aren’t exporting because you think the barrier to entry is too high, you’re missing out. I hope more of my advanced technology and manufacturing colleagues in the U.S. get on board. The world wants what we have to offer.

Remember, “Sine labore nihil”–without labor nothing.

Guest blog post: Developing Foreign Business is Easier than You Think | Department of Commerce.

How does the U.S. Federal Export Promotion Stack Up to Other Exporting Countries?

Re-blogged from the National District Export Council website www.districtexportcouncil.com.

Export Expenditures

On February 28, 2013, Daniel Ogden, Chairman of the National District Export Council,  testified before Congress during a hearing of the House Small Business Trade Subcommittee on the development by the 113th Congress of a small business trade agenda.

In the Testimony, Daniel Ogden provides a comparison of U.S. federal export assistance programs with government-funded export assistance in other large exporting countries. Highlights include:

  1. The UK’s Passport to Export program for SMEs provides free one-on-one mentoring, subsidized training, and a subsidized visit to an overseas market.
  2. Germany provides support to firms exhibiting in trade fairs abroad.  60 percent of all German firms participate in trade fairs; two thirds of which exhibit abroad.
  3. France’s Trade Missions Overseas program provides up to $3,750 to SMEs and includes French pavilions at trade fairs, products and displays, and other t trade promotions.
  4. The Netherlands and Australia have grant programs that pay (up to $110,000 in the Netherlands) for new exporters’ market development costs.

Ogden’s testimony also includes several useful facts on US export assistance including:

  • An overview of the District Export Councils and their purpose
  • Opportunities and challenges for U.S. small business exporters
  • Current organization and proposed reorganizations in federal trade promotions
  • National District Export Council’s position and recommendations to Congress on federal trade promotion

Click here for a PDF copy of the Testimony Transcript, or see the Testimony video below. (Testimony starts at time marker 8:55.)

For more information on the National District Export Council, please refer to their website at http://www.districtexportcouncil.com.

Re-blogged courtesy of Ray Hays, Member of the Arizona District Export Council

38% Growth in Exports over 3 Years Supports 10 million U.S. Jobs

Reblogged courtesy of Ray Hays, Member of Arizona District Export Council

Recognizing Three Years of Export Growth

An article from the ITA Blog, by Under Secretary of Commerce Francisco Sánchez 

March 12, 2013

Francisco Sánchez serves as the Under Secretary of Commerce for International Trade. 

During the last several weeks, we’ve highlighted a lot of great news in the business of U.S. exports.

From record exports in travel and tourism tosuccesses in gaining access for American companies to foreign markets, 2012 gave us a lot to be proud of in the field of exports. More important than just the dollar amounts is the fact that almost 10 million jobs were supported by these exports in 2012.

This success is the direct result of a concentrated initiative introduced by President Obama in 2010, one that has coordinated the efforts of several U.S. government agencies to increase American exports and create American jobs. Under the National Export Initiative (NEI), we’ve seen U.S. exports increase from $1.58 trillion in 2009, to a record $2.2 trillion in 2012.

We recognize the third anniversary of the NEI this week, so we’ll be sharing some of the successes we’ve seen under this initiative over the next several days.

I hope you will get in on the conversation. How have exports helped your business? How can the International Trade Administration and other government agencies help you increase exports? Follow some of America’s core export-promotion agencies on this Twitter list to learn about the government’s efforts to help U.S. business.

As always, ITA is here to help any U.S. company looking to create or increase exports. It all starts with a visit to one of our Export Assistance Centers or to export.gov.

Source: Tradeology, the ITA Blog

Re-blogged courtesy of Ray Hays, Member of Arizona District Export Council

U.S. Green Exporters Get Support from Two Federal Agencies

windmillDepartment of Commerce Working with EPA on Export Promotion

December 14, 2012

Todd DeLelle is an international trade specialist in the International Trade Administration’s Office of Energy and Environmental Industries.

Commerce Department and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) officials will be participating in a series of collaborative activities to promote exports of U.S. environmental solutions during POWER-GEN International, the industry leader in providing comprehensive coverage of the trends, technologies and issues facing the generation sector.  At this year’s show, EPA participation has been folded into the International Buyer Program, a joint U.S. government-industry effort designed to stimulate U.S. exports by promoting U.S. industry exhibitors to foreign markets. Department of Commerce and EPA representatives are meeting with power industry delegates from international markets and U.S. companies at the show’s Global Business Center.

The Department of Commerce and EPA continue to work together to promote U.S. technology exports by integrating EPA’s technical analysis into Commerce’s export promotion and trade policy activities. The two agencies lead The Environmental Export Initiative – an effort to enhance interagency efforts to support U.S. exports of technologies relevant to air emissions, water treatment, and solid waste management.  The Initiative was publicly announced on May 14, 2012 at American University by then-Commerce Secretary Bryson, EPA Administrator Jackson, U.S. Trade Representative Kirk, and Secretary of Agriculture Vilsak.  In 2010, the United States  industry that supplies these goods and services generated an estimated $312 billion in revenue, employed 1.7 million Americans, and experienced a trade surplus of approximately $13 billion, according to Environmental Business International. Its export activities underpin the advancement of environmental quality and human health in other parts of the world, while supporting increased jobs and economic activity in the United States.

While at the show, Commerce and EPA officials will be touting the recently developed Environmental Solutions Exporter Portal. The portal represents a on-line resource for companies interested in U.S. government services and products that facilitate exports. It provides a direct line to U.S. trade and environmental protection specialists and includes information on foreign environmental markets, export facilitation services, export finance products, trade promotion events, and policy initiatives that support the U.S. technology exports.

The Portal also links EPA analysis of key global environmental issues with U.S. solutions providers in the U.S. Environmental Solutions Toolkit.  Currently, the Toolkit includes modules on groundwater remediation,  nutrient removal in municipal water treatment, emissions control from large marine diesel engines, and mercury control from power plant emissions.  The addition of supplemental air pollution control areas is currently underway, including those relevant to: nitrogen oxides emissions control from power plants, air issues relevant to the oil and gas industry, and emissions from non-road diesel engines.

For more information, including how companies can participate, please visit the portal at  www.export.gov/envirotech or www.epa.gov/international/exports.

Article Re-blogged from International Trade Administration, courtesy of Ray Hays, Member – Arizona District Export Council.

Blog: www.rayhays.com

Thailand’s Growing Status as a U.S. Export Market

Video re-blogged courtesy of Ray Hays, Member of  Arizona District Export Council.

 

U.S. Brazilian Trade Relations

A brief on trade with Brazil. Reblogged courtesy of Ray Hays, Member of Arizona District Export Council.

http://www.ustr.gov/about-us/press-office/blog/2012/february/weekly-trade-spotlight-us-%E2%80%93-brazilian-trade-relations

SelectUSA Brings Investment and Jobs to the United States

Reblogged courtesy of Ray Hays, Member of Arizona District Export Council.

Tradeology, the ITA Blog

Barry Johnson is the executive director of SelectUSA and Aaron Brickman is the deputy executive director of SelectUSA

Did you see President Obama’s call to action to invest in America and boost job creation? Well if you missed it check out the White House blog post. Also at the forum, Commerce Secretary John Bryson moderated a panel discussion highlighting foreign direct investment (FDI) as an important source of economic and job growth in the United States.Bar chart showing the impact of Foreign Direct Investment in the United States in 2009. Increase in employmenet by 5%, GDP of 5.1%, Capital Investment of 12%, imports 31%, exports 21%, and research and development 14%. Source: Bureau of Economic Analysis

Currently, the United States is the largest recipient of FDI in the world. In 2010, FDI into the U.S. economy increased to $228 billion from $153 billion in 2009.While the United States has enjoyed this leadership position for decades, the share of FDI to the United States is decreasing. In the 1980s the FDI in the United States accounted for nearly 45 percent of the all foreign direct investment. Today, the United States accounts for less than 15 percent of total FDI…

View original post 604 more words

Exporting at the Speed of Light

An inspiring story of a laid-off U.S. worker, who became a global exporter entrepreneur and created jobs… Hats off! Reblogged courtesy of Ray Hays, Member of Arizona District Export Council.

Tradeology, the ITA Blog

This post contains external links. Please review our external linking policy.

Doug Barry is an International Trade Specialist in the Trade Information Center, part of the U.S. and Foreign Commercial Service

Two years ago he was laid off from his job at the height of the global financial crisis.  Eighteen months ago he started his own company with one employee:  himself.  Today he has 9 employees and is shipping wireless routers he makes to customers in almost 80 countries.

How’d he do it?

William Haynes owns Sabai Technology based in Simpsonville, South Carolina.  His success is due to a good product, timing, execution and some luck.  He also had crucial help from his friends at FedEx and the U.S. Department of Commerce.

He started selling routers to customers in the U.S.  Then he discovered a company that provided VPN service and who had customers overseas that wanted access to the…

View original post 652 more words

U.S. Clean Energy and Energy Efficiency Trade Mission to Saudi Arabia

If you are in the Clean Energy sector, you should be aware of this event. Reblogged courtesy of Ray Hays, Member of Arizona District Export Council.

Tradeology, the ITA Blog

April 14–18, 2012
U.S. Clean Energy and Energy Efficiency Trade Mission to Saudi Arabia
Riyadh and Dhahran (Eastern Province), Saudi Arabia

In April, Assistant Secretary Nicole Lamb-Hale will lead a Clean Energy and Energy Efficiency Trade Mission to Saudi Arabia. The mission will include market briefings by industry experts, opportunities for U.S. firms to meet key Saudi Arabian government officials and decision-makers, hold one-on-one meetings with potential business partners, and enjoy networking events, with the goal of increasing U.S. exports in the clean energy and energy efficiency sectors.

The mission comes at a critical time for both Saudi Arabia and the U.S. clean energy and energy efficiency industry, and has the potential to create opportunities for U.S. exporters while helping Saudi Arabia to achieve its energy goals.

Saudi Arabia has ambitious plans to improve energy efficiency and reduce reliance on hydrocarbons for power generation.  These plans offer abundant opportunities…

View original post 527 more words