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What are the Hot U.S. Export Metro Markets? A Report by the International Trade Administration

Metro Exports Continue to Rise in 2012

July 11, 2013 – ITA Blog

Reblogged courtesy of Ray Hays, Member of Arizona District Export Council
 
Five metro areas achieved more than $50 billion in 2012 exports.

Natalie Soroka is an economist in the Office of Trade and Industry Information within the International Trade Administration where she focuses on international trade statistics and trends.

Five metro areas achieved more than $50 billion in 2012 exports and ten surpassed $25 billion.

After hitting new highs in 2011, exports from U.S. metropolitan areas continued to increase in 2012, with 170 of the 370 metro areas with available data reporting record-high merchandise exports.

Houston-Sugar Land-Baytown, TX topped the list as the largest metro exporter in 2012, shipping $110.3 billion of goods abroad.

Overall, many areas saw continued growth in 2012, with exports increasing in 220 metro areas from the previous year.

The Seattle, WA area saw the highest dollar growth in 2012, up $9.2 billion from 2011. Other areas showing high dollar growth included:

  • Detroit-Warren-Livonia, MI (up $6.0 billion),
  • Houston-Sugar Land-Baytown, TX (up $5.8 billion),
  • Miami-Fort Lauderdale-Pompano Beach, FL (up $4.7 billion),
  • and Washington-Arlington-Alexandria, DC-VA-MD-WV (up $4.4 billion).

While large areas like Houston, New York and Los Angeles contribute greatly to the value of exports from metropolitan areas sent around the world, exports are an important economic driver in smaller markets, too. In 2012, 153 small metro areas exported more than $1 billion of goods. Of these metros, exports from Bloomington, IN exceeded $1 billion for the first time in 2012.

Viewing exports from the metropolitan perspective is important, as these are concentrated areas for industries and economic activity. In 2011, 22 metropolitan areas represented more than 40 percent of their state’s total merchandise export activity.

One such area in 2012 was Miami-Fort Lauderdale-Pompano Beach, FL, whose $47.9 billion in exports accounted for 69 percent of Florida’s total goods exports that year. Aerospace products and parts accounted for the largest share of Miami’s exports, amounting to $4.8 billion in 2012. Other top export categories from Miami that year were computer and peripheral equipment ($4.1 billion) and communications equipment ($3.5 billion).

Of the metro areas in Florida where data is available, 11 MSAs reported increased exports in 2012, led by increases in Miami, Lakeland, and Orlando. On the local level, areas often benefit from geographic proximity and economic or cultural ties to a particular country or region. In fact, Latin American partners dominate Miami’s exports.  Miami exported $18.3 billion of goods to South American markets in 2012, led by Miami’s top market: Venezuela ($5.6 billion). Other top Miami markets in 2012 were Colombia ($2.8 billion), Brazil ($2.6 billion), Mexico ($2.1 billion), and Chile ($2.0 billion).

Miami was also the top exporter to the Dominican Republic-Central America Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA-DR) region in 2012, exporting nearly $5.0 billion to this market in 2012, more than a quarter of which (27 percent) went to the Dominican Republic. Miami actually exported more to the six CAFTA members than it did to either the EU or our NAFTA partners.

While it’s too early to determine any effect from the new free trade agreements with Colombia and Panama, in 2012 Miami was the second largest metro exporter to both of these regions, indicating that it stands to benefit from increased trade with these markets in the future.

This data displays the importance exports are to not only our national economy, but to local economies throughout the country. Exports strengthen local economies and create millions of jobs.

In 2012, exporters reached an all-time record of $2.2 trillion in U.S. exports, supporting 9.8 million jobs. The Department of Commerce has collaborated with the Brookings Institution Metropolitan Policy Program in order to create the Metropolitan Export Initiative. This initiative’s goal is to promote exports and investments in metropolitan regions through localized export plans.

Beginning with the release of 2012 data, information on exports by county and 4-digit NAICS industry codeare available for the top 50 U.S. metro areas.

Visit ITA’s Metropolitan Export Series homepage for more information on metropolitan area exports, including datafact sheets for the top 50 exporting MSAs in 2012, an overview of U.S. Metropolitan Area Exports, and the U.S. Trade Overview with new regional spotlights.

Reblogged courtesy of Ray Hays, Member of Arizona District Export Council.

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Enter new markets: four smart moves

How can you hit the ground running in a brand-new market?

HSBC Global Connections, 17 July 2013
Re-blogged Courtesy of Ray Hays, Member of Arizona District Export Council

Entering a new market

How can you hit the ground running in a brand-new market? From moving up the supply chain to targeting a trophy customer, we look at four ways to give your sales volumes a boost from day one.

A kick-start can get you moving in a new market – and it needn’t be a short-term gimmick. Two food retailers reveal the levers they’ve used.

Go direct to the vendors

Marmalade maker Paul Grant, who owns Scotland-based Mackays, plans to target US grocery chains directly, rather than selling through a wholesaling distributor. The savings will allow him to knock a third off the shelf price.

“You do need to find partners who are prepared to go direct,” he warns. “Some of the traditional importing companies are sometimes reluctant to change the supply chain route, but our importer has been very flexible.”

Make a smart move

Grant is also experimenting with a technique called ‘smart value positioning’, which has been used by fashion brands in the US.

There, high-end products which are sold for a premium price in department stores are stocked in mid-market stores at a better value price.

Capture a trophy

Upmarket chocolatier Richard O’Connor targets a trophy customer in each new market to give his firm, Chocolate & Love, a seal of approval he can use for leverage with smaller outlets.

In the UK, a deal with Harvey Nichols led to subsequent deals with 90 independent fine food shops. An approach to Copenhagen shopping centre Magasin Du Nord likewise put the company on the ‘pre-approved’ list for Denmark’s smaller specialist outlets.

Ask the experts

The two-year-old company exports to Nordic markets as well as France, Belgium and the US, but the overseas orientation by definition exposes O’Connor to markets in which he has few or no contacts. The key is finding the right partner in each market.

O’Connor’s advice is not to be afraid of asking trusted companies in the same industry for help. “In the tight-knit fine food business, trust counts for a lot. I was lucky enough to meet an entrepreneur with more experience who was willing to share her contacts.”

Source: HSBC

Re-blogged Courtesy of Ray Hays, Member of Arizona District Export Council

Is America really terrible at globalization?

I disagree with this post, but I feel that it merits discussion. What are your opinions?

Re-blogged from qz.com courtesy of Ray Hays, Member of Arizona District Export Council.

“The Big Mac Mirage”: America is actually terrible at globalization

By Tim Fernholz — March 5, 2013

Shockingly, this is about as good as American globalization gets. AP Photo/Ng Han Guan

Coke is so prevalent around the world that non-profits look to its supply chain for help on distributing aid. McDonalds, in 122 different countries, is so widespread that there’s a foreign relations theory that no two countries hosting the burger franchise will go to war, although the strong version of that theory is well dead. And Wal-Mart is the world’s third largest global employer, after the American and Chinese militaries, respectively.

The US must be great at globalization, right?

Unfortunately, no, according to Bhaskar Chakravorti, the director of Tufts’ University’s Institute for Business in the Global Context. He says all these examples represent “the myth of American global market power”—they are outliers that disguise the real failing of American multinationals to succeed around the world, and especially in fast-growing emerging markets. Despite what you might hear, he says “we are extremely under globalized.” Here’s an excerpt from a forthcoming paper he’s written with fellow economist Gita Rao (emphasis mine):

In 2010, emerging markets represented 36% of global GDP; these markets already account for the majority of the world’s oil and steel consumption, 46% of world retail sales, 52% of all purchases of motor vehicles and 82% of mobile phone subscriptions. With two-thirds of global growth coming from these markets, in a decade they will account for the majority of the world’s economic value. Yet U.S. companies derived less than 10% of their overall revenues from emerging markets: about as little as 7%, according to HSBC estimates for 2010. The 100 largest companies from the developed world overall made 17% of their revenues from emerging markets, according to a McKinsey report; in other words, the U.S. lags not only emerging market firms in capturing share in emerging markets, but it lags the developed world overall. By considering the difference between the “absolute potential” represented by the 36% number or, to take a much more conservative benchmark, the global peer average of 17% and the U.S. share of 7%, we derive two measures of the gap – and the degree to which U.S. industry has not participated in global growth.

There are several reasons the US is being held back. Some are the intrinsic challenges of doing business abroad: Besides language and cultural barriers, there are underdeveloped supply chains, incomplete capital markets, corruption, etc. But European companies earn 25% of their revenues from emerging markets, so these must be surmountable. What’s America’s problem?

America doesn’t have a legacy of colonization. Despite a hefty history of foreign interference, the US didn’t set up the same deep linkages that Spanish and Portuguese companies did in South America or European countries have in Africa or South Asia. Chakravorti, who was a McKinsey executive for many years, recalls European competitors in Africa asking, ”What are you doing in Africa? Africa belongs to us.” Meanwhile, he says, ”the executives I was working with had no understanding of the socio-cultural context of the continent.”

America is actually pretty insular. Because it’s a big country, and has had many decades of consumer-driven growth, US businesses haven’t necessarily had to look over the horizon for new opportunities. After the 9/11 attacks, Chakravorti says, things got even worse, and most businesses stayed home. It doesn’t help that less than 20% of Americans speak a language other than English, while 56% of Europeans speak a second language.

American business is all about standardization. Companies get economies of scale from selling the same product, but many emerging markets are stratified and require different products and price-points in the same country; while American executives want a  ”Brazil strategy,” what they really need is a strategy for Sao Paulo state and another for more rural areas.

Chakravorti argues that American companies do have what it takes to surmount these challenges, and they’ll need to if they want to bring more growth back to the US.

His strategy starts with a focus on sectors where America can compete abroad but isn’t taking full advantage of the opportunities, particularly in consumer products and large-scale services such as education, elder- and child-care. American companies need to start thinking about tailoring their strategies to demand abroad—particularly at the bottom of the pyramid— but the market can’t do it alone: The government needs to work more closely to tailor its foreign policy to America’s commercial needs while opening education to a more international view.

“That gap has been closed completely in China, because the most powerful companies are state-owned,” Chakravorti says. “We are still talking about the Asia pivot as though it is something dramatic and new, while China has been pivoting for a while.”

Original article link: http://qz.com/59506

38% Growth in Exports over 3 Years Supports 10 million U.S. Jobs

Reblogged courtesy of Ray Hays, Member of Arizona District Export Council

Recognizing Three Years of Export Growth

An article from the ITA Blog, by Under Secretary of Commerce Francisco Sánchez 

March 12, 2013

Francisco Sánchez serves as the Under Secretary of Commerce for International Trade. 

During the last several weeks, we’ve highlighted a lot of great news in the business of U.S. exports.

From record exports in travel and tourism tosuccesses in gaining access for American companies to foreign markets, 2012 gave us a lot to be proud of in the field of exports. More important than just the dollar amounts is the fact that almost 10 million jobs were supported by these exports in 2012.

This success is the direct result of a concentrated initiative introduced by President Obama in 2010, one that has coordinated the efforts of several U.S. government agencies to increase American exports and create American jobs. Under the National Export Initiative (NEI), we’ve seen U.S. exports increase from $1.58 trillion in 2009, to a record $2.2 trillion in 2012.

We recognize the third anniversary of the NEI this week, so we’ll be sharing some of the successes we’ve seen under this initiative over the next several days.

I hope you will get in on the conversation. How have exports helped your business? How can the International Trade Administration and other government agencies help you increase exports? Follow some of America’s core export-promotion agencies on this Twitter list to learn about the government’s efforts to help U.S. business.

As always, ITA is here to help any U.S. company looking to create or increase exports. It all starts with a visit to one of our Export Assistance Centers or to export.gov.

Source: Tradeology, the ITA Blog

Re-blogged courtesy of Ray Hays, Member of Arizona District Export Council

U.S. Green Exporters Get Support from Two Federal Agencies

windmillDepartment of Commerce Working with EPA on Export Promotion

December 14, 2012

Todd DeLelle is an international trade specialist in the International Trade Administration’s Office of Energy and Environmental Industries.

Commerce Department and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) officials will be participating in a series of collaborative activities to promote exports of U.S. environmental solutions during POWER-GEN International, the industry leader in providing comprehensive coverage of the trends, technologies and issues facing the generation sector.  At this year’s show, EPA participation has been folded into the International Buyer Program, a joint U.S. government-industry effort designed to stimulate U.S. exports by promoting U.S. industry exhibitors to foreign markets. Department of Commerce and EPA representatives are meeting with power industry delegates from international markets and U.S. companies at the show’s Global Business Center.

The Department of Commerce and EPA continue to work together to promote U.S. technology exports by integrating EPA’s technical analysis into Commerce’s export promotion and trade policy activities. The two agencies lead The Environmental Export Initiative – an effort to enhance interagency efforts to support U.S. exports of technologies relevant to air emissions, water treatment, and solid waste management.  The Initiative was publicly announced on May 14, 2012 at American University by then-Commerce Secretary Bryson, EPA Administrator Jackson, U.S. Trade Representative Kirk, and Secretary of Agriculture Vilsak.  In 2010, the United States  industry that supplies these goods and services generated an estimated $312 billion in revenue, employed 1.7 million Americans, and experienced a trade surplus of approximately $13 billion, according to Environmental Business International. Its export activities underpin the advancement of environmental quality and human health in other parts of the world, while supporting increased jobs and economic activity in the United States.

While at the show, Commerce and EPA officials will be touting the recently developed Environmental Solutions Exporter Portal. The portal represents a on-line resource for companies interested in U.S. government services and products that facilitate exports. It provides a direct line to U.S. trade and environmental protection specialists and includes information on foreign environmental markets, export facilitation services, export finance products, trade promotion events, and policy initiatives that support the U.S. technology exports.

The Portal also links EPA analysis of key global environmental issues with U.S. solutions providers in the U.S. Environmental Solutions Toolkit.  Currently, the Toolkit includes modules on groundwater remediation,  nutrient removal in municipal water treatment, emissions control from large marine diesel engines, and mercury control from power plant emissions.  The addition of supplemental air pollution control areas is currently underway, including those relevant to: nitrogen oxides emissions control from power plants, air issues relevant to the oil and gas industry, and emissions from non-road diesel engines.

For more information, including how companies can participate, please visit the portal at  www.export.gov/envirotech or www.epa.gov/international/exports.

Article Re-blogged from International Trade Administration, courtesy of Ray Hays, Member – Arizona District Export Council.

Blog: www.rayhays.com

U.S. Exports to Taiwan Growing at 40%

In the rush to the growing mainland Chinese market, some companies overlook the opportunity in Taiwan…

 

Perhaps international companies could learn from former Chinese leader Deng Xiaoping, who said, “cross the river by feeling out the stepping stones.” With a GDP growth rate of 10.5%, the Taiwanese market can serve as an excellent stepping stone into the mainland Chinese market.

Taiwan is identified as a priority market by the U.S. National Export Initiative (NEI). Part of the reason is that U.S. companies have a longer history and fewer complications doing business in Taiwan. This is especially important for U.S. small business exporters, who may find the mainland China market daunting. Taiwan is an easier first step.

In this brief video, the U.S. Senior Commercial Officer in Taipei explains which U.S. export sectors have the best opportunity:

From the U.S. National Export Initiative (NEI)

With a population of only 23 million, Taiwan is our ninth-largest trading partner, ahead of much larger economies. Taiwan’s GDP grew by almost 10.5 percent in 2010, while U.S. exports increased by 40 percent. Taiwan has considerably lowered its tariffs since its accession to the WTO in 2002. The island has benefited economically from expanding business activities into the Chinese Mainland. Taiwan imports a wide variety of electronic, optical and precision instruments, information and communications products, transportation equipment, machinery, and electrical products. Its high-tech sector relies heavily on technology licenses and imports of specialty components from the United States.

For more information about Taiwan:

 

Brought to you by Ray Hays, Member Arizona District Export Council.

Ray Hays serves as an international consultant for businesses that wish to enter new global markets or expand current operations abroad.

Click here for more information on consulting services of Ray Hays.


Exporting to Vietnam – Quick Tips for Smooth Sailing…

Seeking untapped export opportunities? Then take a look at Vietnam.

From the U.S. National Export Initiative (NEI)

Vietnam is a true emerging market, offering ground floor and growing opportunities for U.S. exporters and investors. Vietnam’s economic growth rate has been among the highest in the world, expanding at an average of 7.2 percent per year from 2001 to 2010.  Since the 2001 Bilateral Trade Agreement, trade between the U.S. and Vietnam has increased over six-fold, from $2.9 billion in 2002 to $18.6 billion in 2010.  In 2010, U.S. exports to Vietnam grew by 19.8 percent to $3.7 billion.

For more information about Vietnam:

Brought to you by Ray Hays, Member Arizona District Export Council.

Ray Hays serves as an international consultant for businesses that wish to enter new global markets or expand current operations abroad.

Click here for more information on consulting services of Ray Hays.

Exporting to India – Tips in 2 Minutes

See the following video from the National Export Initiative (NEI) …

India is seeing rapid economic growth, a growing middle class, and increased urbanization.  India’s GDP in 2009 was the 11th largest in the world and 4th-largest in purchasing-power parity terms.  GDP growth is expected to reach approximately 8% each year through 2015.  Between 2002 and 2009, U.S. goods exports to India quadrupled, growing from $4.1 billion to more than $16.4 billion.  India has large potential for investments in infrastructure in order to continue its growth: Over $1 trillion in infrastructure development needs between now and 2030 including in energy (renewable and civil nuclear), as well as in health care (medical technology, pharmaceuticals, and health IT), defense and homeland security, civil aviation (aircraft and infrastructure), retail and franchising, and ICT.

For more information about India:

Brought to you by Ray Hays, Member Arizona District Export Council.

Ray Hays serves as an international consultant for businesses that wish to enter new global markets or expand current operations abroad.

Click here for more information on consulting services of Ray Hays.

Exporting to China – 3 tips in 3 minutes

Exporting to China? Want to export to China? Take a moment to see this 3-minute interview with the U.S. Commercial Officer in Shanghai.

Click here for video “NEI Priority Markets: China

Source: National Export Initiative (NEI)

The Global Competitiveness Report 2011-2012

For those of you doing international business, this is a must-read.

The U.S. falls to 5th place, after Switzerland, Singapore, Sweden and Finland.

Enjoy… and please let us know your thoughts!

Click here: The Global Competitiveness Report 2011-2012