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China vs. the United States

A Popularity Contest in the Global Court of Public Opinion

Economic Power

The two superpowers went head-to-head in a worldwide survey, recently published by the Pew Research Center. Comparisons in the survey included perceptions of global image, world power, ways of doing business, popular culture, political views, individual rights, science and military threat, among others.

Based on the survey, the Pew Report identified the following general global opinions:*

Strong Ties with US or China

China’s economic power is on the rise, and many think it will eventually supplant the United States as the world’s dominant superpower.

  • Overall, the U.S. enjoys a stronger global image than China.
  • Globally, people are more likely to consider the U.S. a partner to their country than to see China in this way, although relatively few think of either nation as an enemy.
  • The military power of both nations worries many.
  • China’s growing military strength is viewed with trepidation in neighboring Japan, South Korea, Australia and the Philippines.
  • Meanwhile, the Obama administration’s use of drone strikes faces broad opposition – half or more in 31 of 39 countries disapprove of U.S. drone attacks against extremist groups.
  • Across the nations surveyed, a median of 70% say the American government respects the personal freedoms of its people. In contrast, a median of only 36% say this about China.

US consider your interestsChina consider your interests

Not surprisingly, attitudes towards the U.S. and China varied significantly by region:

  • In Europe, the U.S. gets mostly positive ratings. President Barack Obama has been consistently popular among Europeans, and since he took office in 2009, Obama’s popularity has given America’s image a significant boost in the region.
  • European perceptions of China are much less positive – among the eight European Union nations polled, Greece is the only one in which a majority expresses a favorable view of China.
  • Moreover, ratings for China have declined significantly over the last two years in a number of EU countries, including Britain, France, Poland and Spain.
  • America’s image is the most negative in parts of the Muslim world, especially Pakistan (11% favorable), Jordan (14%), Egypt (16%), and the Palestinian territories (16%). Only 21% of Turks see the U.S. positively, although this is actually a slight improvement from last year’s 15%.
  • But the Muslim world is hardly monolithic, and America receives largely positive ratings in predominantly Muslim nations such as Senegal in West Africa and Indonesia and Malaysia in Southeast Asia.
  • Elsewhere in the Asia/Pacific region, the U.S. receives particularly favorable reviews in the Philippines, South Korea and Japan.
  • Chinese investment in Latin America and sub-Saharan Africa has increased significantly over the past decade, and views toward China are largely positive in both regions.
  • Attitudes toward the U.S. also tend to be favorable, and overall the U.S. receives slightly higher ratings than China in in Latin America and sub-Saharan Africa.

The survey also finds rising tensions between the American and Chinese publics:

  • Just 37% of Americans express a positive view of China, down from 51% two years ago.
  • Similarly, ratings for the U.S. have plummeted in China – in a 2010 poll conducted a few months after a visit to China by President Obama, 58% had a favorable impression of the U.S., compared with 40% today.
  • Young people in both countries express more positive attitudes about the other, a finding that is part of a broader pattern – in many countries, both the U.S. and China receive more favorable marks from people under age 30.
*Note: Survey conclusions above are quoted verbatim to avoid external  interpretation of the results.

For more details, the full 132-page report may be downloaded from the Pew Research Center at the following link:

http://www.pewglobal.org/files/2013/07/Pew-Research-Global-Attitudes-Project-Balance-of-Power-Report-FINAL-July-18-2013.pdf

The report above is shared courtesy of Ray Hays, Member of Arizona District Export Council.

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What are the Hot U.S. Export Metro Markets? A Report by the International Trade Administration

Metro Exports Continue to Rise in 2012

July 11, 2013 – ITA Blog

Reblogged courtesy of Ray Hays, Member of Arizona District Export Council
 
Five metro areas achieved more than $50 billion in 2012 exports.

Natalie Soroka is an economist in the Office of Trade and Industry Information within the International Trade Administration where she focuses on international trade statistics and trends.

Five metro areas achieved more than $50 billion in 2012 exports and ten surpassed $25 billion.

After hitting new highs in 2011, exports from U.S. metropolitan areas continued to increase in 2012, with 170 of the 370 metro areas with available data reporting record-high merchandise exports.

Houston-Sugar Land-Baytown, TX topped the list as the largest metro exporter in 2012, shipping $110.3 billion of goods abroad.

Overall, many areas saw continued growth in 2012, with exports increasing in 220 metro areas from the previous year.

The Seattle, WA area saw the highest dollar growth in 2012, up $9.2 billion from 2011. Other areas showing high dollar growth included:

  • Detroit-Warren-Livonia, MI (up $6.0 billion),
  • Houston-Sugar Land-Baytown, TX (up $5.8 billion),
  • Miami-Fort Lauderdale-Pompano Beach, FL (up $4.7 billion),
  • and Washington-Arlington-Alexandria, DC-VA-MD-WV (up $4.4 billion).

While large areas like Houston, New York and Los Angeles contribute greatly to the value of exports from metropolitan areas sent around the world, exports are an important economic driver in smaller markets, too. In 2012, 153 small metro areas exported more than $1 billion of goods. Of these metros, exports from Bloomington, IN exceeded $1 billion for the first time in 2012.

Viewing exports from the metropolitan perspective is important, as these are concentrated areas for industries and economic activity. In 2011, 22 metropolitan areas represented more than 40 percent of their state’s total merchandise export activity.

One such area in 2012 was Miami-Fort Lauderdale-Pompano Beach, FL, whose $47.9 billion in exports accounted for 69 percent of Florida’s total goods exports that year. Aerospace products and parts accounted for the largest share of Miami’s exports, amounting to $4.8 billion in 2012. Other top export categories from Miami that year were computer and peripheral equipment ($4.1 billion) and communications equipment ($3.5 billion).

Of the metro areas in Florida where data is available, 11 MSAs reported increased exports in 2012, led by increases in Miami, Lakeland, and Orlando. On the local level, areas often benefit from geographic proximity and economic or cultural ties to a particular country or region. In fact, Latin American partners dominate Miami’s exports.  Miami exported $18.3 billion of goods to South American markets in 2012, led by Miami’s top market: Venezuela ($5.6 billion). Other top Miami markets in 2012 were Colombia ($2.8 billion), Brazil ($2.6 billion), Mexico ($2.1 billion), and Chile ($2.0 billion).

Miami was also the top exporter to the Dominican Republic-Central America Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA-DR) region in 2012, exporting nearly $5.0 billion to this market in 2012, more than a quarter of which (27 percent) went to the Dominican Republic. Miami actually exported more to the six CAFTA members than it did to either the EU or our NAFTA partners.

While it’s too early to determine any effect from the new free trade agreements with Colombia and Panama, in 2012 Miami was the second largest metro exporter to both of these regions, indicating that it stands to benefit from increased trade with these markets in the future.

This data displays the importance exports are to not only our national economy, but to local economies throughout the country. Exports strengthen local economies and create millions of jobs.

In 2012, exporters reached an all-time record of $2.2 trillion in U.S. exports, supporting 9.8 million jobs. The Department of Commerce has collaborated with the Brookings Institution Metropolitan Policy Program in order to create the Metropolitan Export Initiative. This initiative’s goal is to promote exports and investments in metropolitan regions through localized export plans.

Beginning with the release of 2012 data, information on exports by county and 4-digit NAICS industry codeare available for the top 50 U.S. metro areas.

Visit ITA’s Metropolitan Export Series homepage for more information on metropolitan area exports, including datafact sheets for the top 50 exporting MSAs in 2012, an overview of U.S. Metropolitan Area Exports, and the U.S. Trade Overview with new regional spotlights.

Reblogged courtesy of Ray Hays, Member of Arizona District Export Council.

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Enter new markets: four smart moves

How can you hit the ground running in a brand-new market?

HSBC Global Connections, 17 July 2013
Re-blogged Courtesy of Ray Hays, Member of Arizona District Export Council

Entering a new market

How can you hit the ground running in a brand-new market? From moving up the supply chain to targeting a trophy customer, we look at four ways to give your sales volumes a boost from day one.

A kick-start can get you moving in a new market – and it needn’t be a short-term gimmick. Two food retailers reveal the levers they’ve used.

Go direct to the vendors

Marmalade maker Paul Grant, who owns Scotland-based Mackays, plans to target US grocery chains directly, rather than selling through a wholesaling distributor. The savings will allow him to knock a third off the shelf price.

“You do need to find partners who are prepared to go direct,” he warns. “Some of the traditional importing companies are sometimes reluctant to change the supply chain route, but our importer has been very flexible.”

Make a smart move

Grant is also experimenting with a technique called ‘smart value positioning’, which has been used by fashion brands in the US.

There, high-end products which are sold for a premium price in department stores are stocked in mid-market stores at a better value price.

Capture a trophy

Upmarket chocolatier Richard O’Connor targets a trophy customer in each new market to give his firm, Chocolate & Love, a seal of approval he can use for leverage with smaller outlets.

In the UK, a deal with Harvey Nichols led to subsequent deals with 90 independent fine food shops. An approach to Copenhagen shopping centre Magasin Du Nord likewise put the company on the ‘pre-approved’ list for Denmark’s smaller specialist outlets.

Ask the experts

The two-year-old company exports to Nordic markets as well as France, Belgium and the US, but the overseas orientation by definition exposes O’Connor to markets in which he has few or no contacts. The key is finding the right partner in each market.

O’Connor’s advice is not to be afraid of asking trusted companies in the same industry for help. “In the tight-knit fine food business, trust counts for a lot. I was lucky enough to meet an entrepreneur with more experience who was willing to share her contacts.”

Source: HSBC

Re-blogged Courtesy of Ray Hays, Member of Arizona District Export Council